What are the 95 Theses of Martin Luther?

Martin Luther and the 95 Theses

I got 95 theses but the Pope aint one.


Oct 28, 2011 . He held the 95 Theses weren't nailed to the Wittenberg church door, but rather mailed to particular ecclesiastical superiors."Luther did not post .

Read a  of the 95 theses; a listing of the three main points, in the words of Martin Luther.

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I’ve attempted to read through the 95 theses several times, and never gotten past #20 without my eyes blurring and having to start just skimming them. I think the reason is because of the archaic and verbose language.

Read here the 95 theses Martin Luther nailed to the door of the castle church at Wittenberg 1517:


May 14, 2005 . Like Luther, I present 95 theses or in my case, 95 faith observations drawn from my 64 years of . Authentic science can and must be one of humanity's sources of wisdom for it is a source . Matt has clearly reminded us of "the way" with his 95 sign posts. . But you make it primary, rather than secondary.

95 THESES TO THE MODERN EVANGELICAL CHURCH “revised”! by Greg Gordon


In 1517 Luther, informed by his growing belief that salvation is by faith alone, presented his concerns to Church officials in the form of ninety-five theses, a series of statements that presented a logical argument against the sale of indulgences. An account arose later that he nailed the theses to the door of the castle church at Wittenberg as an act of defiance. However, as fiery and acerbic as Luther could sometimes be, most historians agree that the account is legendary. Historical research suggests that he sent a letter along with the 95 theses, which included an invitation to discuss the issues openly, to Archbishop Albert of Mainz. Martin Luther wrote his 95 theses in 1517 as a protest against the selling of indulgences. After he sent a copy of the theses to Albert of Mainz (who sent a copy to Pope Leo), Luther continued to write, elaborating on the issues raised.Luther sent his 95 Theses to a few bishops and some friends; therefore he did not expect or receive a prompt response. By the end of 1517, however, copies of the 95 Theses had been printed in Leipzig, Nuremberg and Basel. Some humanists and princes passionately approved of the theses, but parts of the Roman Church completely rejected them. The most vehement voice against the theses was the , who supposedly categorized Luther as a follower of the heretic Jan Hus and threatened to have him burned at the stake.History records Martin Luther as a savior of Christianity. He was concerned with the well-being of the Catholic Church and its policy of granting forgiveness through indulgence rather than penance. Luther's actions were neither cinematic nor groundbreaking. The message of 95 Thesis gave the summary and expressed the feelings of many of his peers already had about the corruption of Christ's teachings.
Luther illustrated the spiritual, material, and psychological truths behind abuses in the practice of buying and selling indulgences. He was not out to pick a fight or to have his own way; his purpose was to uphold the truth, for the cause of Christ.The purpose of the was to invite local scholars to a disputation on indulgences. He addressed a lot of hierarchy issues within the church.
The following point summary shows the purpose of Martin Luther’s 95 Thesis:When Martin Luther posted the 95 theses, his intention was to discuss and debate the misuse of indulgences, but it was interpreted by the church heirarchy as an attack on the power of the papacy.On October 31, 1517, Luther, having penned the “Disputation on the Power and Efficacy of Indulgences,” or the “95 Theses,” nailed them to the door of Wittenberg Castle church. This was not an act of defiance. It was how academics and theologians of the day began debate on matters.The 95 Theses, which would later become the foundation of the Protestant Reformation, were written in a remarkably humble and academic tone, questioning rather than accusing. The overall thrust of the document was nonetheless quite provocative. The first two of the theses contained Luther’s central idea, that God intended believers to seek repentance and that faith alone, and not deeds, would lead to salvation. The other 93 theses, a number of them directly criticizing the practice of indulgences, supported these first two.Committed to the idea that salvation could be reached through faith and by divine grace only, Luther vigorously objected to the corrupt practice of selling indulgences. Acting on this belief, he wrote the “Disputation on the Power and Efficacy of Indulgences,” also known as “The 95 Theses,” a list of questions and propositions for debate. Popular legend has it that on October 31, 1517 Luther defiantly nailed a copy of his 95 Theses to the door of the Wittenberg Castle church. The reality was probably not so dramatic; Luther more likely hung the document on the door of the church matter-of-factly to announce the ensuing academic discussion around it that he was organizing.Printing was very big in the Reformation as Martin Luther's 95 Theses were printed and circulated widely. Broadsheets were also issued for the anti-indulgences position. These broadsheets contributed to the development of the newspaper.