Martin Luther and the 95 Theses

Martin Luther and the 95 Theses

Martin Luther Against the Bankers and the Renaissance Balance Sheet

On October 31, 1517, a young Catholic monk named Martin Luther nailed the 95 Theses to the church door in Wittenberg, Germany. This single bold act set off a religious reformation that shook Europe and the world. Luther was later excommunicated by the papacy; a price set on his head.

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Martin Luther and the 95 Theses Videos

The Castle Church, often called, “All Saints Church,” is where Martin Luther nailed the Ninety-Five Theses on the door on October 31, 1517. While the original wooden door no longer stands, a massive bronze memorial door marks the spot that changed the course of history. Martin Luther’s grave be viewed inside Castle Church. On November 1, 2017, the final session of The Wittenberg’s 2017 Summit will convene inside Castle Church. Don’t miss it!

Martin Luther and the 95 Theses in Claymation

So now I try to explain the question that starts this investigation frenzy; why did Martin Luther write the 95 theses? Martin Luther lived during the 16th century, was a priest from the lands of Germany which at that point in time fell within the realm of the Holy Roman Empire and is dubbed the father of the Protestant Reformation. It all started when a friar of Dominican ancestry by the name of Johann Tetzel was by the Roman Catholic Church to Germany in a bid to raise funds for the renovation of the Rome based St. Peter’s Basilica by selling indulgences; the mission embarking commencing in 1516. Come the 31st day of October the next annum in 1517 and Martin Luther would write to the Archbishop of Mainz & Magdeburg – Albrecht – objecting to the selling of indulgences; his intention being to merely question the nature of the church practices at the time rather than confronting the entire institution.

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The Ninety-Five Thesis on the Power of Indulgences were written by Martin Luther in 1517 and are widely regarded as the primary means for the Protestant Reformation. Dr Martin Luther used these Thesis to display his unhappiness with the Church's sale of indulgences, and this eventually gave birth to Protestantism. It especially defied the teachings of the Church on the nature of penance, the authority and power of the pope and the efficacy of indulgences. They sparked a theological dispute that would result in the Reformation and the birth of the Lutheran, Reformed, and Anabaptist traditions within Christianity.
Martin Luther did not intend the Thesis to be a program for reform, an attack on the Pope, etc. He was simply questioning the indulgences.Nearly half a millennium ago, on what is believed to be the eve of All Saints’ Day 1517, Martin Luther approached the doors of Castle Church in Wittenberg, Germany, carrying his “95 Theses on the Power and Efficacy of Indulgences.” And, in the popular imagination, a nail to pound it into the church’s door.Martin Luther read the Bible over and over again and became convinced that the churches teaching of how to get into heaven was wrong. The church said that a mixture of faith and good works were needed to get into heaven. Luther now started to believe that faith alone will get you into heaven. This was called ‘justification by faith alone’.The Castle Church, often called “All Saints Church,” is where Martin Luther nailed the Ninety-Five Theses on the door on October 31, 1517. While the original wooden door no longer stands, a massive bronze memorial door marks the spot that changed the course of history. Martin Luther’s grave can be viewed inside Castle Church. On November 1, 2017, the final session of The Wittenberg’s 2017 Summit will convene inside Castle Church. Don’t miss it!On this day in 1517, the priest and scholar Martin Luther approaches the door of the Castle Church in Wittenberg, Germany, and nails a piece of paper to it containing the 95 revolutionary opinions that would begin the Protestant Reformation.On 31 October 1517, Luther wrote to his bishop, , protesting the sale of indulgences. He enclosed in his letter a copy of his "Disputation of Martin Luther on the Power and Efficacy of Indulgences", which came to be known as the . Hans Hillerbrand writes that Luther had no intention of confronting the church, but saw his disputation as a scholarly objection to church practices, and the tone of the writing is accordingly "searching, rather than doctrinaire." Hillerbrand writes that there is nevertheless an undercurrent of challenge in several of the theses, particularly in Thesis 86, which asks: "Why does the pope, whose wealth today is greater than the wealth of the richest , build the basilica of St. Peter with the money of poor believers rather than with his own money?"