Structuring a Thesis Introduction | Explorations of Style

If you read and learn this article, you will easily compose your thesis introduction.

Thesis and Introduction Worksheet | Department of English

Not all theses have a separate theory section. In the the theory section is included in the introduction, and the second chapter covers the methods used.

The introduction is the broad beginning of the paper that answers three important questions:

Thesis and Introduction Worksheet Katherine Milligan

Like in any good Hollywood movie, the first task of the introduction is to set the scene, giving your paper a context and seeing how it fits in with previous research in the field.

This all suggests, of course, that the time you spend on the introduction is time well spent!

I am in the process of writing my Ph.D. thesis and struggling with the introduction chapter, what to cover, what not. This is a technical thesis. The broad area is molecular simulation in statistical mechanics.

This all suggests, of course, that the time you spend on the introduction is time well spent!


Your essay lacks only two paragraphs now: the introduction and the conclusion. These paragraphs will give the reader a point of entry to and a point of exit from your essay.The order of items above is the best order to present each part of the introduction: get the reader's attention, move toward the thesis statement, and then present the thesis statement. The thesis statement usually is most effective as just one sentence at the end of the introduction, so you should avoid presenting the thesis statement as the first sentence of the introduction and should avoid presenting the thesis statement in more than one sentence. (Information about thesis statements is presented on Web page.) An introduction does not need to be long (and should not be), but it is an important part of an essay. A weak introduction can cause readers to lose interest in your essay from the start, whereas a strong introduction will engage your readers and make them want to continue reading. Of course, the introduction is the first part of your essay that your audience will read, and it's important to make a good first impression. This page provides suggestions to help you write strong introductions. The introduction is a key paragraph for both readers and writers. First impressions matter. The reader will be more inclined to read a paper and consider a position if the initial paragraph is clear, organized and engaging. For the writer, a carefully crafted first paragraph acts as a springboard, establishing the order and direction for the entire paper.

The form and content of an introduction depend upon many factors, including the specifics of the assignment, the intended audience, the style of the discipline and the expectations of your professor. In general, your introduction should:Each of the introductions below presents the same thesis statement: "Identity theft is a serious problem that claims millions of innocent victims, and the government must implement better regulations to help put an end to this crime." While the thesis statement is the same for all of the introductions, notice how the various introductions set different tones for the essay and establish slightly different expectations for what will follow in the body of the essay.Start your introduction with an interesting "hook" to reel your reader in. An introduction can begin with a rhetorical question, a quotation, an anecdote, a concession, an interesting fact, or a question that will be answered in your paper. The idea is to begin broadly and gradually bring the reader closer to the main idea of the paper. At the end of the introduction, you will present your thesis statement. The thesis statement model used in this example is a thesis with reasons.The introduction to a dissertation or thesis serves a few functions. First, it introduces the reader to the general topic at hand, as well as the approach which will be taken to investigate said topic. Second, it piques the reader's interest so that s/he wants to continue reading the text. Third, it gives the reader sufficient background information so that the topic and approach make sense, but not so much that it resembles the literature review. Finally, the introduction lays out the rest of the dissertation or thesis so the reader is left with a structure for what s/he will read. Accomplishing all of these tasks in a relatively short chapter - and doing so in a lively style, with relevant content - is difficult. Let GraduateWriter know if you need help kicking off your dissertation or thesis.Rephrase your thesis statement in the first sentence of the conclusion. Instead of summarizing the points you just made, synthesize them. Show the reader how everything fits together. While you don't want to present new material here, you can echo the introduction, ask the reader questions, look to the future, or challenge your reader. Many writers mistakenly assume the first draft of their introduction is the final draft; take the time to revise your introduction once you've completed the paper. Make sure that the introduction reflects what you have discovered through the process of composing the full argument.
Understand the purpose of the introduction paragraph. The introductory paragraph of an essay allows you to give your readers general information about your topic. This general information will lead into the specific point you want to make in your paper, which is known as the thesis statement.