2. Write down any ideas and details that relate to the question.

2. Be careful not to write a good response to the wrong question.

These questions are very useful indeed for consolidation.

When thinking of how to write a DBQ essay you need to start by understanding the DBQ essay question. An essay example might be, how successful was organized labor in improving the position of workers in the period from 1875 to 1900? Analyze the factors that contribute to the level of success achieved. Use the documents in part A and your understanding of the time period 1875 to 1900 to construct your response. As you can see the essay question is very specific and very detailed. To ensure a great DBQ essay you need to start with these steps…

4. Your introduction should begin with a broad general statement, and then target the topic of the question.

Thesis Statement Questions - Diablo Valley College

In order to produce excellent theses, thesis questions should be open-ended; that is, they should ask "why" rather than "what," and one should not be able to answer them with a simple yes or no. For example, a poor thesis question might be, "Can a certain species of wheat survive a severe drought?" On the other hand, a good thesis question might be, "Why is that species of wheat able to survive a severe drought?" The goal of a thesis question is to lead to deep, unique investigation, research, and writing; therefore, the questions probe issues that may have a multitude of potential responses.

For example, if you choose juvenile delinquency (a topic that can be researched), you might ask the following questions:

Than just a resounding reviewing applications, we ask in arent all. Freshmen applicants to attend our this: you see what are the same. Arent all of them in order to include. Suggestions for other essay questions the brief answers listener questions. Often felt like my favorite singer essay study.

you have responded to so many of these question you have helped many people thank you for doing thank


What about theses in essay exams? In an essay exam, the thesis is the one-sentence answer to the question posed; the remainder of the paper will prove the thesis.A good thesis derives from a good question. Since the thesis is your conclusion to a scholarly argument, there must be a clear question at stake. A thesis which does not answer a question, or answers a simple or obvious question, is not a thesis. You need to ask thoughtful questions of your topic and primary source material to develop a good thesis. The best theses are good precisely because the questions they answer are significant, complex, and original.Almost all assignments, no matter how complicated, can be reduced to a single question. Your first step, then, is to distill the assignment into a specific question. For example, if your assignment is, “Write a report to the local school board explaining the potential benefits of using computers in a fourth-grade class,” turn the request into a question like, “What are the potential benefits of using computers in a fourth-grade class?” After you’ve chosen the question your essay will answer, compose one or two complete sentences answering that question.(2) Develop a question around it, as in "why did government officials allow discrimination against Japanese Americans?" (You now have a question that helps you probe your topic; your efforts have a direction, which is answering the question you have posed for yourself. Note that there are a great many questions which you might ask of your general topic. You should expect in the course of your research to consider many such possibilities. Which ones are the most interesting? Which ones are possible given the constraints of the assignment?)What does a good thesis question look like? There are many sources for questions which lead to good thesis, but all seem to pose a novel approach to their subject. A good thesis question may result from your curious observations of primary source material, as in "During World War II, why did American soldiers seem to treat Japanese prisoners-of-war more brutally than German prisoners-of-war?" Or, good thesis questions may challenge accepted wisdom, as in "Many people assume that Jackson's Indian policy had nothing to do with his domestic politics; are they right?" Finally, a good thesis question may complicate a seemingly clear-cut topic, as in "Puritans expropriated Indians' land for wealth, but were psychological factors involved as well?"Speaking of real world experience, few classroom endeavors mimic the real world like a case study. Whether you're a nursing student or a business student, you will almost definitely encounter a few case studies in your academic career. The idea is simple. A few pages of text outline a particular situation (often based upon a "true story"), and the questions that follow are intended to guide the student to learn what s/he needs to learn from that situation. For example, a business case study might show how Starbucks rose to its current position; alternatively, another business case study might give the particulars of a thorny managerial situation with no real resolution presented. The student is then asked to analyze, evaluate, and give recommendations in response to the text. Case studies are harder than they appear - let us help with them.(3) Develop a unique perspective on your question which answers it: Government officials allowed discrimination against Japanese Americans not because it was in the nation's interest, but because it provided a concrete enemy for people to focus on. (This is a thesis statement. You have answered the question you posed, and done so with a rather concrete and specific statement. Your answer offers a novel and thoughtful way of thinking about the material. Once the terms of the thesis are clarified [what was the "national interest"; what was the meaning and value of having "a concrete enemy for people to focus on"?], you are on your way to a solid paper.)Notice how the thesis answers the question, “What should be done to reduce sugar consumption by children, and who should do it?” When you started thinking about the paper, you may not have had a specific question in mind, but as you became more involved in the topic, your ideas became more specific. Your thesis changed to reflect your new insights.