The Purpose Of A Thesis Statement Is To Inform Readers Of:

Because the thesis statement still isn’t perfect, we’ll move on to the next essential component.

without a properly composed thesis statement a thesis statement is a

Thesis Statement is a central organizing idea of your essay supported by reliable reasoning or evidence. It is usually written at the beginning of your work and thus, it sets the direction of scientific research. However, thesis statement may be changed in any way in the process of writing. A thesis statement is written in the first paragraph of your essay and is developed throughout the essay.

The thesis statement is typically that ONE sentence in your paper that asserts, controls, and structures the entire argument.

Thesis Statements - The Writing Center

Rusul,
This is fantastic. I'm printing it out and will distribute it to my students this upcoming year. My simple definition for a thesis statement is one or two sentences that answers the question with insight. I find so often students are comfortable restating the question without taking a stance. It is far easier for them to repeat the verbiage than develop originality, yet as teachers we need to develop this confidence in the originality of their thoughts and their ability to covey those thoughts in their own voice. That is where your statement, that a thesis is a result of close reading, is imperative. The closer a student reads, the closer he or she will write.

A thesis statement is necessary to focus your paper. It helps you articulate your ideas and helps readers understand the purpose of your paper.

This handout describes what a thesis statement is, how thesis statements work in your writing, and how you can craft or refine one for your draft.

Get an idea what the thesis statement is, the basic rules and the purpose of its writing.


The thesis statement is also a good test for the scope of your intent. The principle to remember is that when you try to do too much, you end up doing less or nothing at all. Can we write a good paper about problems in higher education in the United States? At best, such a paper would be vague and scattered in its approach. Can we write a good paper about problems in higher education in Connecticut? Well, we're getting there, but that's still an awfully big topic, something we might be able to handle in a book or a Ph.D. dissertation, but certainly not in a paper meant for a Composition course. Can we write a paper about problems within the community college system in Connecticut. Now we're narrowing down to something useful, but once we start writing such a paper, we would find that we're leaving out so much information, so many ideas that even most casual brainstorming would produce, that we're not accomplishing much. What if we wrote about the problem of community colleges in Connecticut being so close together geographically that they tend to duplicate programs unnecessarily and impinge on each other's turf? Now we have a focus that we can probably write about in a few pages (although more, certainly, could be said) and it would have a good argumentative edge to it. To back up such a thesis statement would require a good deal of work, however, and we might be better off if we limited the discussion to an example of how two particular community colleges tend to work in conflict with each other. It's not a matter of being lazy; it's a matter of limiting our discussion to the work that can be accomplished within a certain number of pages.The key difference between an opinionstatement and thesis statement is that a thesis conveys to the reader thatthe claim being offered has been thoroughly explored and is defendable byevidence. It answers the "what" question (what is the argument?) and itgives the reader a clue as to the "why" question (why is thisargument the most persuasive?). The thesis statement should remain flexible until the paper is actually finished. It ought to be one of the last things that we fuss with in the rewriting process. If we discover new information in the process of writing our paper that ought to be included in the thesis statement, then we'll have to rewrite our thesis statement. On the other hand, if we discover that our paper has done adequate work but the thesis statement appears to include things that we haven't actually addressed, then we need to limit that thesis statement. If the thesis statement is something that we needed prior approval for, changing it might require the permission of the instructor or thesis committee, but it is better to seek such permission than to write a paper that tries to do too much or that claims to do less than it actually accomplishes.Notice that this Assertion is the first reason presented in the thesis statement. Remember that the thesis statement is a kind of "mapping tool" that helps you organize your ideas, and it helps your reader follow your argument. In this body paragraph, after the Assertion, include any evidence–a quotation, statistic, data–that supports this first point. Explain what the evidence means. Show the reader how this entire paragraph connects back to the thesis statement.Of course, one can re-work a thesis statement indefinitely and one canalmost always find something at fault with it. The point is that you mustbe sure that your thesis statement is indicating to your reader that youhave an argument to make.A thesis statement is a sentence that makes an assertion about a topic and predicts how the topic will be developed. It does not simply announce a topic: it says something about the topic.The thesis statement is a preliminary answer to the research question you pose. A strong introductory thesis statement, followed by thorough research in the body of the paper, should convince the reader that you are, indeed, addressing and resolving a pertinent research question. The strategic restatement of the thesis statement in the conclusion should carry a convincing rhetorical effect to the readers that your research problem has been resolved.This thesis statement is not debatable. First, the word pollution means that something is bad or negative in some way. Further, all studies agree that pollution is a problem; they simply disagree on the impact it will have or the scope of the problem. No one could reasonably argue that pollution is good.